We have a podcast!

Not long after we got the Patreon page all set up, and this site reworked and it was all going along lovely… I (Heather) got a job. Actually, I got several jobs. Multiple jobs. And suddenly found myself working 50 plus hours a week with a daily drive of about 2 hours. Now, this meant I had way less time to work on the CU group and website but it did mean that I had plenty of downtime to listen to audio books and podcasts. Continue Reading

How Value Bias Blinds Us

“I refuse to allow my kids access to the addictive agents such as video games and leisure tv (cartoons) all day.”

– Christian Unschooling forum user

“refuse” – That is problematic.

“addictive” – That is problematic.

“all day” – That is problematic.

You have set up beliefs on false information that seems reasonable and true because it is touted by “experts” and from “pulpits” and “tradition” etc.

Getting to the root of your “why” on such things will help you to see that they are fear based. Continue Reading

Unexpected Passions – Unleashing Potential: An Unschooling Conversation

This discussion appeared recently on the Christian Unschooling Facebook Group:

SARAH: Does anyone’s child have a passion that you never would have predicted?

My 7yo son LOVES chickens! He is the chicken whisperer I tell you! He makes pets out of them all, grieves when a young rooster has to go to the freezer, and he is the one who can get the eggs out from under the pecky hens without getting pecked. He and I read hatchery catalogs together and get excited about the new breeds that we want to try raising. We have plans to build a new coop this fall and he is looking into starting a business raising pheasants. We have talked about how that if we went to public school, some insecure kid might make fun of him for loving chickens but he never has to endure that kind of bullying. He can just like what he likes! It’s really a lot of fun, though, sharing a passion with your child. Continue Reading

Sowing Seeds Of Potential

When you sow, you do not plant the body that will be, but just a seed, perhaps of wheat or of something else.  1 Corinthians 15:37

Strewing is a lot like how farmers sow seeds.  You sprinkle things, ideas, and opportunities onto fertile soil and wait and see what happens.

In order to understand what happens when you strew, you have to understand the process of what a farmer goes through every year. Continue Reading

Unschooling Hopes

What I hoped to see happen in unschooling my children was simple. I wanted a life where school simply wasn’t. I wanted my kids to fully experience life–not a different kind of schooling, not school at home, not superior curriculum. I wanted to continue raising kids that love life and love learning about all kinds of things this spectacular world has to offer.

One of the first ‘a-ha’ moments, if you will, happened one warm September afternoon when we were all just hanging about outside. The kids, around six and eight years old (if I’m remembering correctly) were looking at various things under the microscope my husband had set up on the picnic table. They were bringing us all kinds of things to look at–water from a puddle, grass, toenails, bugs both dead and alive, hairs both human and dog/cat/critter…you name it, they wanted to put it under the microscope. We’d been at this for awhile on that evening, the four of us enjoying our time together outside and exploring the microscopic world. Continue Reading

Unschooling Question: What About Math and the Other Boring Stuff They Need?

This post was written back in 2008– since then we have become completely radical unschoolers and it has been an amazing journey.  Back then I never would have guessed the kids would become passionately interested in and teach themselves (yes, they have taken on ALL the boring stuff.:))

I run into this question often from friends, family members, forums, and even unschooling friends. Many are fearful enough that their children won’t naturally attempt to learn things they deem boring or important (often both) that they specifically purchase a curriculum for just that subject – regardless of whether the child has shown interest in it. Continue Reading

When Unschooling Becomes a Lifestyle

The other day the antique appraiser I help out, remembering how in the past I have needed to work less in order to spend time teaching the kids, asked when I needed to change my schedule and be less available. It caught me off guard because I have gotten so used to our lifestyle of learning.

It took me a moment to come up with an answer that would avoid getting into this whole unschooling business but also satisfy her. I said that the kids had, for the most part, taken over their own learning and listed quickly off all the projects they have done in the last few months, being careful to point out the expected learning that has occurred in this unexpected way. She was satisfied and moved on to the project at hand while I got to be completely honest without going into a detailed explanation. Continue Reading